astrophysics and the implications of such

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zoldos

Leviathan
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I've been into physics, esp. astrophysics for years. I've mainly studied Quantum Mechanics, and some General Relativity as well. Really trippy shit, and a lot has been proven, such as time itself actually slows down the faster someone is moving, but not for everyone else! Time is NOT constant!
 

SpookyZalost

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Yeah time, space, and mass seem to be relative to the density of mass in space/time.

I personally think that dark matter is interacting with mass creating drag when you travel faster but it's hard to prove/disprove that without accelerating really really fast and studying the effects.

might explain black holes though, beyond being hyperspatial spheres where more than 3 spatial and 1 temporal dimension exist.
 
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SpookyZalost

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A wormhole is just a black hole connected to a white hole, a tunnel rather than a hole in space/time.

anti-gravity would be some kind of negative force. something that rather than attracting mass to it like dark matter might, it instead repels it away.
 
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zoldos

zoldos

Leviathan
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A wormhole is just a black hole connected to a white hole, a tunnel rather than a hole in space/time.

anti-gravity would be some kind of negative force. something that rather than attracting mass to it like dark matter might, it instead repels it away.
So you are saying you'd survive a trip into a black hole? What about singularities?

Yes, but what actually causes the anti-gravity? I'm still trying to fully understanding General Relativity as well. ;)
 

SpookyZalost

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So you are saying you'd survive a trip into a black hole? What about singularities?

Yes, but what actually causes the anti-gravity? I'm still trying to fully understanding General Relativity as well. ;)
Well that's the trick isn't it.

Theoretically if you were to generate a warp bubble you might be able to survive a black hole, if you could isolate the gravity field's effects and keep it stable with the heavy distortion of space/time.

but you'd need to do that much to traverse a black hole/white hole pair anyway since the throat would effectively be closed unless forced open or stabilized some how.

that's the problem with it. Technically both could exist, but only tiny particles could travel through it unless you made the singularity point bigger some how.

as for anti-gravity, the only thing I can really think of since I'm not a theoretical physicist and mostly a citizen scientist and aspiring engineer.

would be to think of it like a depth charge. if we are to compare space/time to an ocean, then gravity is regions where currents pull you towards a central point while a depth charge does the opposite, the force of it pushes everything away from it, including that which it's submerged in.

possibly an anti-matter explosion could briefly generate a region of negative gravity if it were big enough... though if that were the case I certainly wouldn't want to detonate one that big in a star system...
 
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zoldos

zoldos

Leviathan
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Well that's the trick isn't it.

Theoretically if you were to generate a warp bubble you might be able to survive a black hole, if you could isolate the gravity field's effects and keep it stable with the heavy distortion of space/time.

but you'd need to do that much to traverse a black hole/white hole pair anyway since the throat would effectively be closed unless forced open or stabilized some how.

that's the problem with it. Technically both could exist, but only tiny particles could travel through it unless you made the singularity point bigger some how.

as for anti-gravity, the only thing I can really think of since I'm not a theoretical physicist and mostly a citizen scientist and aspiring engineer.

would be to think of it like a depth charge. if we are to compare space/time to an ocean, then gravity is regions where currents pull you towards a central point while a depth charge does the opposite, the force of it pushes everything away from it, including that which it's submerged in.

possibly an anti-matter explosion could briefly generate a region of negative gravity if it were big enough... though if that were the case I certainly wouldn't want to detonate one that big in a star system...
Nice. I'm digging that. Not sure if a singularity does really exist though. Doesn't the true existence of such violate our current laws of physics?
 

SpookyZalost

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Nice. I'm digging that. Not sure if a singularity does really exist though. Doesn't the true existence of such violate our current laws of physics?
So here's the thing... we've found evidence of kerr Singularities a few months ago when a burst of energy was amplified and captured the rotational energy of the black hole it passed close to.

in other words a Gigawatt energy burst became a Terrawatt one which is crazy considernig all it did was pass through the previously theoretical ergosphere by passing close to the event horizon.

theoretically a black hole btw could give up 29 percent of it's mass as rotational energy this way meaning they can be harnessed as a power source.
 
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zoldos

zoldos

Leviathan
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So here's the thing... we've found evidence of kerr Singularities a few months ago when a burst of energy was amplified and captured the rotational energy of the black hole it passed close to.

in other words a Gigawatt energy burst became a Terrawatt one which is crazy considernig all it did was pass through the previously theoretical ergosphere by passing close to the event horizon.

theoretically a black hole btw could give up 29 percent of it's mass as rotational energy this way meaning they can be harnessed as a power source.
Awesome! I love this stuff. I've been out of the loop for awhile tho and have fallen behind.... :(
 

SpookyZalost

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@zoldos There's another consequence of kerr singularities being a thing. Spinning singularities actually have a predicted shape. they aren't singular points at all, the rotation turns them into a torus and have been nicknamed, Ringularities.
 
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zoldos

zoldos

Leviathan
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@zoldos There's another consequence of kerr singularities being a thing. Spinning singularities actually have a predicted shape. they aren't singular points at all, the rotation turns them into a torus and have been nicknamed, Ringularities.
Have these been observed? I know recently someone actually photographed a black hole! Pretty freaking cool.
 

SpookyZalost

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Have these been observed? I know recently someone actually photographed a black hole! Pretty freaking cool.
So the problem is, the ring singularity would be beyond the event horizon. but if you wanna fly into the black hole and find out...

here's where it gets really crazy though.

kerr singularities have this thing called an ergosphere, and one of the interesting effects of said ergosphere besides stealing energy from the singularity...

is that space/time is so distorted you could if you had the right slingshot trajectory you could actually leave the space/time distortion before you entered it.

Time travel that goes backward in time, that's completely legal as far as relativity is concerned :p
 
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zoldos

zoldos

Leviathan
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So the problem is, the ring singularity would be beyond the event horizon. but if you wanna fly into the black hole and find out...

here's where it gets really crazy though.

kerr singularities have this thing called an ergosphere, and one of the interesting effects of said ergosphere besides stealing energy from the singularity...

is that space/time is so distorted you could if you had the right slingshot trajectory you could actually leave the space/time distortion before you entered it.

Time travel that goes backward in time, that's completely legal as far as relativity is concerned :p
haha Wicked. I don't understand the math behind all this, but I can "see it in my head" so to speak. My only problem with time travel into the past is the possibility of a paradox (ever seen the movie "Millennium")? But this can be negated with the multiverse theory and alternate realities.....
 

SpookyZalost

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@zoldos the way I see it is like this. there's layers right? there's the temporal multiverse and the quantum multiverse.

the temporal multiverse contains all possibilities from the big bang forward, and then there's the quantum multiverse which contains temporal multiverses from all possibilities. one is layered on top of the other, and beyound it is something else... a realm of quantum states where things pop into and out of existence based on observation... we certainly couldn't exist there without a warp bubble to protect our local causality.

as for time travel, it shouldn't cause a problem because it just creates a split on the temporal multiverse lines. though causality should be maintained if you leave the singularity before you arrived because you're only briefly crossing your own timeline, so if there is a split it wouldn't be noticed.
 
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zoldos

zoldos

Leviathan
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@zoldos the way I see it is like this. there's layers right? there's the temporal multiverse and the quantum multiverse.

the temporal multiverse contains all possibilities from the big bang forward, and then there's the quantum multiverse which contains temporal multiverses from all possibilities. one is layered on top of the other, and beyound it is something else... a realm of quantum states where things pop into and out of existence based on observation... we certainly couldn't exist there without a warp bubble to protect our local causality.

as for time travel, it shouldn't cause a problem because it just creates a split on the temporal multiverse lines. though causality should be maintained if you leave the singularity before you arrived because you're only briefly crossing your own timeline, so if there is a split it wouldn't be noticed.
Coolness, I'm really digging that. I totally believe in the multiverse, and esp. wave functions (here's a quick tangent): What constitutes an observation needed to collapse the wave into an actual particle? Why are humans so special and apparently able to collapse a function? What if a Dolphin observes the double slit experiment? Is the photon a wave or a particle?
 

SpookyZalost

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I can answer the last one. It's both. Photons are being kept around the speed of light by space/time drag for lack of a better description. The energy state of the photon is constantly in flux between a particle and a wave because of this so it's both.
 
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zoldos

zoldos

Leviathan
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I can answer the last one. It's both. Photons are being kept around the speed of light by space/time drag for lack of a better description. The energy state of the photon is constantly in flux between a particle and a wave because of this so it's both.
But why does an observation make it become an actual particle while when not being directly observed it behaves as a wave? It can't be both at the same time and how can a single particle interfere with itself as shown in the double slit experiment?
 

SpookyZalost

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But why does an observation make it become an actual particle while when not being directly observed it behaves as a wave? It can't be both at the same time and how can a single particle interfere with itself as shown in the double slit experiment?
That's one of those big questions that I think has something to do with string theory, something to do with quantum wave functions and how frequencies can change when observed.
 
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zoldos

zoldos

Leviathan
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That's one of those big questions that I think has something to do with string theory, something to do with quantum wave functions and how frequencies can change when observed.
Indeed. The holy grail of modern physics. I really like string/M theory since it appears to describe quantum gravity but is sadly untestable since the energies required are astronomical.... :(
 

SpookyZalost

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Feb 12, 2022
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@zoldos hopefully, much like warp drive, this becomes cheaper.

in the last 25 years I've watched warp drive go from, more energy than the entire universe to, about as much as a jupiter size planet, to as little as a decent fusion power plant. (still more than we can make right now, but I highly reccomend building a dyson swarm around the sun to help with this.)
 
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