Fish Aquariums

Discussion in 'Pets & Animals' started by Sharon, May 26, 2017.

  1. Sharon

    Sharon Member

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    Do you or have you ever had fish as pets? Growing up my parents always had an aquarium however I didn't really appreciate it back then. Recently I purchased one myself. There are some benefits to having an aquarium in the house. For example, they help you relax and lower your blood pressure when you're feeling tense. It can ultimately even help you sleep easier. There is something about letting the mind just observe the fish as they swim around. Some even say that if you don't want to deal with an aquarium just having a screen save with swimming fish can be beneficial.
     
  2. zoldos

    zoldos Administrator Staff Member

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    Cool. Yeah my dad always had fish in a big aquarium. I also had a gold fish as a child but it didn't seem to live very long. Do you have like a filter and all that fancy stuff?
     
  3. Sharon

    Sharon Member

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    I do! The filter definitely keeps the water from getting too dirty too fast. Right now I have goldfish and koi in it, but that's only temporary. I am waiting for my husband to get his aquaponics system up and running and we will be transferring the fish into it. After that, I plan on getting Tropical fish but I'm unsure at to which ones I'll go with.
     
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  4. zoldos

    zoldos Administrator Staff Member

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    Awesome! Yeah Tropical fish are cool but you have make sure to maintain a certain temp. in the water.
     
  5. Sharon

    Sharon Member

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    This is true... that is why the water heater is important to have as tropical fish typically like to be in 75F degree water.
     
  6. Flinch

    Flinch Active Member

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    I have two comet goldfish in a 20 gallon long. I really like how "chill" they are. (And for goldfish, I really do prefer the more natural "comets" over fancy goldfish. They seem less alien; I can relate to them better).

    I've gone through several iterations of African Cichlid tanks. (Lake Malawi). Unlike goldfish, they are territorial and somewhat aggressive -- and much smarter. (Mine used to watch TV with me!). Very deliberate movements, and a bit high strung (nervous). For this kind of aggressive fish, you have to have either very few, with enough niche's (caves and stuff) for each OR crowd the tank such that no individual can claim territory. (The latter is why fish stores can keep such fish).

    Neither of the two adjacent African "Rift" Lakes (Malawi and Tanganyika) drain into the ocean -- they are freshwater, but somewhat marine-like. A cool thing about those lakes is that nearly ALL of the fish species are cichlids. (And they don't get very big -- so ideal for pet fish in a modest-sized tank). There are many varieties, very colorful options. (Lake Victoria also has cichlids -- those have a more conventional look -- not "classic" African Cichlids). My last ones were two "Electric Blues".

    They are tropical, but not marine. Way easier (much more tolerant of temperature and water quality changes). (And I used a heater only in winter). Also Marine fish, for the most part, need to be "harvested" from the wild. (Though there is some success in breeding Clown Fish in captivity -- an exception). The harvesting process is hell. About 99 fish die for every one that makes it into a home tank. And very disruptive to that ecosystem. (So, you really need to be much more serious about it, if you do a marine tank). (I never have, seems unnecessary, given all the freshwater tropical options).

    Once a bought a used 55 gallon tank. But it had fish -- so I never did follow through my plan for that (a Tanganyika tank -- a little tricky, sand substrate). Among those fish were two LARGE Tinfoils Barbs, very cool for that tank.

    So, Sharon, do say more about what you're thinking about.
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2017
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  7. zoldos

    zoldos Administrator Staff Member

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    When my g/f and I got together in 2006, our very first pet was a "Beta Fish". We named him Sabgul. :)
     
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  8. Sharon

    Sharon Member

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    I never was a big fan of the fancy goldfish... they always make me think like they have tumors or something. :p

    I like the idea of schooling fish e.g. Zebra Danios, Cardinal Tetras, Cory Catfish, etc. I've read that the schooling is more of a defensive mechanism so I'm thinking of also getting a Dwarf Gourami.

    I only have a 29 gallon tank right now. As a gain more confidence I may consider something like a 55 gallon tank.
     
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  9. zoldos

    zoldos Administrator Staff Member

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    Nice! How much does the 55 gallon one cost?
     
  10. Sharon

    Sharon Member

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    Brand new... a 55 gallon tank will cost at least $300 (probably without a stand included). However, buying used is the best way to go if one is interested in saving a lot of money. People get bored and keeping fish they find is not their thing so they stop the hobby. People will sometime list their aquarium for $50-$100 on Craigslist. If the 55 Gallon tank is priced over $100 it usually comes with more accessories and includes the stand.
     
  11. zoldos

    zoldos Administrator Staff Member

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    Cool! I can't remember how big the one my dad used to have. He had "Algae Eaters" in it! hehe

    hqdefault.jpg
     
  12. Sharon

    Sharon Member

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    AH yes Pleco fish... I've read about those. They get REALLY big. I've seen people end up needing to rehome them because their tanks were not big enough to accommodate them.
     
  13. zoldos

    zoldos Administrator Staff Member

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    The ones my dad had were only about 2 or 3 inches long. :)
     
  14. Sharon

    Sharon Member

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    Here is a glimpse of my set up:

    [​IMG]

    I have live plants but the some of the leaves are turning brown. I need to figure out how to fix that.
     
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  15. zoldos

    zoldos Administrator Staff Member

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    Coolness!! I swear I saw an Algae Eater in the creek behind my childhood home one day. It was very odd!!! hehe
     
  16. Sharon

    Sharon Member

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    Thankfully I haven't had an issues with algae. I read that it's only really a problem when you expose your fish tank to too much sunlight. Just for fun I decided to put a short clip together of my aquarium. :)

     
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  17. zoldos

    zoldos Administrator Staff Member

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    Very cool! I love fish! :biggrin The water is very clean too, excellent.
     
  18. Sharon

    Sharon Member

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    Yes I definitely try to stay on top of the cleanliness of the water. I know I don't like to live in a dirty house so I imagine fish would appreciate the same considering that water is the equivalent to our air. I don't know about you but I like breathing clean air. hehe
     
  19. Flinch

    Flinch Active Member

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    I haven't bothered with gravel ("substrate") lately. (As long as the bottom is opaque, it doesn't seem to unsettle the fish). For nitrogen cycle bacteria "media", a "wet/dry" filter* seems to be totally enough (i.e. I don't need the surface area of gravel for that). I do let algae build up on some terracotta houses (originally bird houses, unglazed ceramic) -- so I guess that's another good surface for nitrifying bacteria. The algae-covered furniture is instead of plants. Having a clean (no gravel) bottom makes cleaning easier, and more effective. (Though, I could totally appreciate wanting gravel. That's good too).

    *I like the Marineland Penguin wet/dry filters. I use a small one (Penguin 100 -- PetSmart Link) for a 20 gallon-long tank, with very few fish. I turn it off in the morning when I feed the fish, and turn it on when I get home. (Actually, I do often turn it off even more than that). I think actually that it's more relaxing for the fish to not have the pump going all the time. It's not really needed if your biological load (number, and mass, of fish) doesn't exceed the nitrifying bacteria capacity.
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2017
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