Stanford Prison Experiment

Discussion in 'Obtuse Flotsam' started by ladyowl, Jun 17, 2017.

  1. ladyowl

    ladyowl Active Member

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    Starting out in law enforcement just recently, I have started watching documentaries about prison, prison life, and everything else in general. I stumbled upon the Stanford Prison Experiment and I thought it was pretty interesting. I think it proves that if people are given power they will use it to their possible advantage if they can. I thought this was very interesting and would love to know what other's opinions are about this.
     
  2. zoldos

    zoldos Administrator Staff Member

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    I'm not familiar with this. What's it about? I do love shows like "Lock Up" and "Women Behind Bars" ( :biggrin )
     
  3. ladyowl

    ladyowl Active Member

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  4. Flinch

    Flinch Active Member

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    The article expresses doubt about the meaning of the study ("from the beginning ... haunted by ambiguity"). The outcome was, perhaps, a result of how the roles -- prisoner and guards -- were presented, and the tacit approval of abuse towards prisoners.

    I agree with the conclusion of the author that these studies (the Milgram obedience study too) don't necessarily reveal an INNATE propensity to cruelty. I believe this also for a different reason ...

    A power dynamic of guards over prisoners provides PERMISSION for the guards to (un-awarely) work through a ton of subconscious life long hurt -- in a really bad way. As psycho-dynamic "play", this can be good, but only with some understanding of what's going on, and permission of the "victim" (as consensual play). In real life settings, we do need to be careful with people given authority over others (e.g. in a prison setting) using that as a psycho-therapeutic "release". I really do believe that's what's going on, sometimes.

    For that reason, our prisons must have open transparency. The trend towards privatization of prison operations (which Obama started to reverse in the federal system) is not something we can allow. (Also because a profit incentive has no place in our criminal justice system).

    The movie, too, (2015, starring Billy Crudup) was very worthwhile.
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2017
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  5. ladyowl

    ladyowl Active Member

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    I watched the documentary first, and then watched the movie afterwards, I truly felt sick as I watched it. I couldn't imagine feeling that way. It said they "prisoners" had no long lasting effects from the experiment, but I can't see how someone couldn't possibly get PTSD from this. It was very traumatic for them, or so it seemed.
     
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  6. Flinch

    Flinch Active Member

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    I just enjoyed a really great -- kinda topical -- film, "The Free World" (2016). A woman (Elisabeth Moss) who has killed her abusive cop husband comes into the life of a recently released prisoner who had served a lot of time, profoundly shaping him.

    The Free World.jpg

    I just saw this, "The Free World," on Showtime.
     
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